Wednesday, April 5, 2017

All MacBooks being locked down in May

By: Anna Sheets


 The deployment of Macbooks to the entire student body for the 2016-2017 school year has proved to be as problematic as it has been effective. Due to the misuse of the machines, such as gaming and streaming music or videos, there have been three different levels of punishments designed to counteract student’s specific offenses.
  The first level and most basic entails all your teachers sending a list of approved websites to technology specialist Mr. Sears, who will then restrict the student’s MacBooks to the specified sites only.
  “I have been restricted on the first level since the second day of school and it has handicapped my ability to research efficiently, but it’s not crippling, by any means. It does help me focus!” Said sophomore Ally Cate.
  The second level is the most commonly used and restricts the Macbooks so that they can only access the lockdown browser and no websites other than Canvas. This makes it difficult for students to do research for their classes, as well as eliminating all streaming possibilities.
  The final level of restriction is when the internet cannot be accessed on the Macbook at all, on the school’s wifi or any other wifi. This makes it very difficult for students to do well in their classes if their teachers are hard to work with.
  “The school has us on paper rations this year anyways - kids getting their macbooks locked down is not helping us conserve our already dwindling supply!” Said English teacher Liz Sayre.
  The excess in gaming and streaming has led to the need for stricter rules. Some students have even been caught on the Deep Web, using browsers such as Torr. Accessing websites on Torr on a government-owned computer immediately flags Homeland Security, which leads to further investigations into a student’s personal browsing history on their home computers and even their cell phones.
     “The deep web is not something to be trifled with; everything from the sale of illegal firearms to people trafficking takes place over browsers like Tor and the Purple Onion,” said Sears.
  There is a lot at risk when students explore browsers that are prone to that kind of crowd, as it brings attention to the school as a whole. Browsing such sites at the school is especially dangerous, in that the IP address of the school can be leaked, leading dangerous people right to the school, endangering the lives of every student at the school.
  “There have been two students thus far in the year that Homeland Security has inquired about due to their browsing history and habits,” Principal Will Hosaflook said when asked about the validity of the rumors.
  Because of the extreme consequences and potentially detrimental outcomes.

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